An analysis of population of older men and women in osteoporosis

Received Sep 3; Accepted Nov 3. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

An analysis of population of older men and women in osteoporosis

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If you're a woman, you're automatically at greater risk for osteoporosis than men. The International Osteoporosis Foundation estimates that osteoporosis affects about million women worldwide. Why the gender gap? Women start with lower bone density than their male peers and they lose bone mass more quickly as they age, which leads to osteoporosis in some women.

Between the ages of 20 and 80, the average white woman loses one-third of her hip bone density, compared to a bone density loss of only one-fourth in men. According to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, osteoporosis statistics show a greater burden for women in the following ways: One of every two women over age 50 will likely have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime.

Building Better Bones Osteoporosis may have its roots in childhood and adolescence, which is the period when your body does the most bone building. Women reach their peak bone mass at about age 18 while men reach theirs at After that, both women and men continue to build small amounts of bone mass, but men add more than women.

Because of growth in the population of older people, the number of hip fractures is estimated to be million in men by Osteoporotic fractures are associated with considerable morbidity and enormous health care costs [ 4 ]. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Osteoporosis; National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: Osteoporosis and related bone diseases; Bone health and osteoporosis: a report of the Surgeon General; USDA SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health. What Women Need to Know. Being female puts you at risk of developing osteoporosis and broken bones. Here are some facts: It is routinely recommended for postmenopausal women and men age 50 and older and is how osteoporosis is diagnosed in older people. Bone density tests are usually only done for premenopausal women if they break several.

By 30, your bones are fully stocked, and although your body will continue to replace old bone cells, there will be no increase in bone mass past that point.

Osteoporosis and Estrogen Add osteoporosis to the long list of health issues, like mood swings and migrainesthat you can blame on your hormones. Although there are other possible genetic and environmental factors behind bone loss, your body's changing levels of estrogen remains the most culpable suspect.

At the same time, it plays a role in keeping bones strong and healthy, in both men and women. While premenopausal women have more estrogen than men, they will experience dramatic drops in estrogen production due to menopause, and are more likely to experience bone loss and osteoporosis at that time.

Women are at increased osteoporosis risk related to estrogen levels if they: Experience irregular or infrequent periods, or began having their periods at a later than normal age Have had their ovaries removed at any age Are going through menopause, with those undergoing menopause at an early age having an even higher risk Women lose bone mass much more quickly in the years immediately after menopause than they do at any other time in their lives.

In contrast, data suggests that women who have more estrogen than their peers, such as women who began their menstrual cycles earlier than normal or who have used estrogen containing contraceptives, are likely to have higher bone density. Underdiagnosed in Men Because osteoporosis occurs more frequently in women than men, less attention is paid to bone health in men, and those who have osteoporosis may go undiagnosed and untreated.

A study of nursing home residents over age 50 revealed that doctors were less likely to consider osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment for men than women, even when the men had recently experienced a fracture, a widely recognized red flag for osteoporosis.

The reality is that 80, men experience osteoporosis-related fractures every year, and close to 23, die as a result of fracture-related complications. Bone loss is a normal part of aging in both men and women; by about age 75, men and women lose bone at the same rate and both genders are less able to absorb calcium.

However, when men get osteoporosis, it is usually related to another health condition, a lifestyle choice smoking or alcohol abuseor medication that has bone loss as a side effect.

An analysis of population of older men and women in osteoporosis

Osteoporosis risk is different for men and women, but the disease is dangerous for anyone who gets it. Talk to your doctor about getting an osteoporosis screening if you know you have risk factors.Bone loss is a normal part of aging in both men and women; by about age 75, men and women lose bone at the same rate and both genders are less able to absorb calcium.

Osteoporosis affects 1 in 4 women and more than 1 in 8 men over the age of 50 years, with 1 in 4 men and women having evidence of a vertebral fracture (,). Canada: Almost 30, hip fractures occur each year (). Oct 28,  · or older are estimated to have osteoporosis, women from other racial/ethnic backgrounds are also at risk for osteoporosis and low bone mass.

Five percent of non-Hispanic black women over age 50 are estimated to have osteoporosis; an estimated additional. Health Care Use Among Older Women by Kristen Robinson, Ph.D., Office of Analysis and Epidemiology Introduction Women are the majority in the older population.

In , there were 21 million women aged 65 years and over living in the United States, compared 23 percent for older men (11). Osteoporosis. The underlying study provides representative data on prevalence rates and comorbidities of osteoporosis based on the German population aged 50 years and older.

The overall prevalence was estimated to % (men %, women %) and, for women, the rates increased substantially with age. Because of growth in the population of older people, the number of hip fractures is estimated to be million in men by Osteoporotic fractures are associated with considerable morbidity and enormous health care costs [ 4 ].

Facts and Statistics | International Osteoporosis Foundation